Gravitational Factors of Our Eight Planets

By Doug Bennett
Jupiter, at more than 317 times the mass of the Earth, exerts the greatest gravitation pull on the Earth of all the planets.

According to Newton’s law of universal gravitation, all objects exert a pull on other objects. Whether it is an individual standing on the surface or another planet across the solar system, a planet exerts a gravitational pull on both. The following is a listing of the gravitational forces of the planets.

Gravitational Pull on the Earth

The moon exerts the greatest gravitational pull on Earth, a force that produces the planet’s tides. Therefore, the easiest way to compare the gravitational pull of the other planets is to compare their attraction to that of the moon. This is accomplished by dividing each planet's relative mass to the moon by the cube of its relative distance from the Earth.

Gravitational Pull at a Planet's Surface

The easiest way to compare the gravitational pull of the planets at their surface is to compare their pull to that which is experienced on Earth. This is accomplished by dividing the planet’s relative mass to the Earth by the square of its relative radius.

Jupiter's Gravity

Of all the planets, Jupiter exerts the greatest gravitational pull on the Earth. However, this pull is only 0.0000068 times the gravitational pull of the moon. Jupiter’s gravitational pull at its surface is 2.36 times that of Earth.

Venus' Gravity

Venus has the second-strongest gravitational pull on the Earth. The pull of Venus is 94.1 percent of the gravitational pull of Jupiter. Venus’ gravitational pull at its surface is 0.9 times that of Earth.

Mars' Gravity

Mars has the third-strongest gravitational pull on the Earth. The pull of Mars is 41.2 percent of the gravitational pull of Jupiter. Mars’ gravitational pull at its surface is 0.38 times that of Earth.

Mercury's Gravity

Mercury has the fourth-strongest gravitational pull on the Earth. The pull of Mercury is 7.4 percent of the gravitational pull of Jupiter. Mercury’s gravitational pull at its surface is, like Mars, 0.38 times that of Earth.

Saturn's Gravity

Saturn has the fifth-strongest gravitational pull on the Earth. The pull of Saturn is 3.5 percent of the gravitational pull of Jupiter. Saturn’s gravitational pull at its surface is 0.92 times that of Earth.

Uranus' Gravity

Uranus has the sixth-strongest gravitational pull on the Earth. The pull of Uranus is 0.05 percent of the gravitational pull of Jupiter. Uranus’ gravitational pull at its surface is 0.89 times that of Earth.

Neptune's Gravity

Neptune has the seventh-strongest gravitational pull on the Earth. The pull of Neptune is 0.014 percent of the gravitational pull of Jupiter. Neptune’s gravitational pull at its surface is 1.13 times that of Earth.

Pluto's Gravity

In 2006, Pluto, at about one-sixth the size of the moon, was demoted from planet status, now considered a dwarf planet. Pluto exerts almost no gravitational pull on the Earth because of its tiny mass and enormous distance from Earth. Pluto’s gravitational pull at its surface is 0.07 times that of Earth. This means a 170-pound person would weigh 11.9 pounds on the surface of Pluto.

About the Author

Doug Bennett has been researching and writing nonfiction works for more than 20 years. His books have been distributed worldwide and his articles have been featured in numerous websites, newspapers and regional publications. Bennett's background includes experience in law enforcement, the military, sound reinforcement and vehicle repair/maintenance.