What Kind of Environments Do Crickets Live In?

By Leslie Renico
Crickets are often found under rocks.

Crickets are a variety of insects with more than 900 species under the order Orthoptera. They are either brown or black, and they have four wings, with their front wings covering their hind wings when standing. Their antennae run almost the entire length of their body. They are omnivorous, eating mostly decaying fungi and plant material.

Shadow

To avoid predators, crickets are primarily nocturnal and prefer dark spaces such as beneath rocks and inside logs. Different species of crickets are found all over the globe, with more than 120 species in the United States alone. They live in just about every conceivable biome, from swamp and marshlands to rain forests, mountains and deserts.

Semi-Arid Climate

If crickets live in a climate that is too moist, a fungus can begin to spread over their bodies. They tend to lay their eggs in moist areas, but they cannot live there for long. In experiments, they prefer an environment with grass and soil over one with pebbles and sand.

Temperature

Crickets thrive ideally at a temperature from 82 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit. They can live in climates with highs in the 70s, but their functions take longer, such as laying eggs and reproducing. At temperatures above 96, they start to die.

Mating Preferences

Male crickets sing to attract females as part of the courtship ritual. Studies have shown, though, that females tend to prefer the songs of younger males, which are distinguished by their higher volume and pitch.

About the Author

Leslie Renico's grant-writing career began in 2006 and her grants have brought in millions of dollars for nonprofits serving the poor and providing medical care for the needy. Renico has appeared on television and her articles have appeared in various online publications. She graduated from Saginaw Valley State University with a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice in 1997.