How to Make a Model of the Planet Uranus

By Joan Reinbold; Updated April 24, 2017
Uranus is a striking celestial feature of our solar system.

Uranus is a blue-green planet with rings that was discovered in 1781 by William Herschel. This planet is a gas giant, also known as a Jovian planet, whose coloration comes from the methane in its atmosphere. It is the seventh planet from the sun, and it takes about 84 Earth years to complete its orbit around the sun. Making a model while learning about Uranus provides learners with a more interactive lesson.

Get pictures of Uranus. Study the composition of the planet, its tilt and why it looks the way it does.

Spread newspaper on a work surface.

Inflate a balloon until it is 5 inches in diameter. Mix three parts glue to one part water in the bowl. Cut newspaper into strips. Dip a strip of newspaper into the glue and water mixture, and apply it to the balloon. Coat the entire outside of the balloon with more glue covered strips of newspaper. Set the balloon aside to dry.

Make the ring system. Measure the diameter of the dried papier-mache sphere.

Draw a circle that is slightly smaller than this diameter on the card stock. Measure 2 inches out from this circle, and draw another circle. Cut out the both circles. Set the inner circle aside.

Draw the rings of Uranus onto both sides of the card stock ring with the colored pencils, keeping an eye on the Uranus pictures for reference. Slide the card stock ring onto the papier-mache sphere, making sure not to squash it. If it is too snug to fit properly onto the papier-mache sphere, cut a little out of the hole and try sliding it on again.

Hold the model so that it tilts in accordance with Uranus's axis. Poke two holes approximately 1/2 inch apart on the "top" of the model with the curved upholstery needle. Thread the curved upholstery needle with a length of string, passing it down one hole and back up the other. Tie the ends of the string together.

Paint the model to look like Uranus, again using the pictures as a reference, and hang it up over newspaper to dry.

About the Author

Joan Reinbold is a writer, author of six books, blogs and makes videos. She has been a tutor for students, library assistant, certified dental assistant and business owner. She has lived (and gardened) on three continents, learning home renovation in the process. She received her Bachelor of Arts in 2006.