Volcano Science Fair Project for Kids

By Taylor DiVico; Updated April 24, 2017
Kids can create a science fair project that imitates volcanic eruptions.

Creating a volcano science fair project can draw attention to your booth with blasts of erupting lava for viewers to enjoy. Create your volcano and lava using household products for an inexpensive and creative activity that mimics the chemical reactions and explosions of a real natural disaster.

Glue the plastic or glass bottle onto the middle of the cardboard using super glue. Apply pressure so that the bottle adheres to the cardboard.

Pour six cups of flour and two cups of salt into your mixing bowl. Mix the flour and salt with a spoon. Pour one cup of water into the bowl. Mix and knead to form clay. Add up to one more cup of water and continue mixing until the clay reaches your desired texture.

Pack your wet clay around the bottle to form a cone-shaped volcano that is narrow at the top and wide at the bottom. Add layers of clay so that the volcano is sturdy. Create more clay, if needed.

Apply water to the exterior of the volcano with your hand to smooth out creases or bumps. Leave an opening at the top of the volcano for lava to flow out of during the eruption. Allow 24 hours for the interior and exterior of the volcano to dry.

Paint the volcano using tempura or acrylic paint. Allow the paint to dry for four hours. Paint the cardboard that the volcano is attached to and add details such as rocks, sand, grass or figurines at the base of the volcano for a life-like representation.

Portion out your lava recipe into multiple plastic water bottles so that it is already measured out for each eruption. Pour 1/2 cup of vinegar, two to three drops of dish soap and three drops of orange or red food coloring into each plastic bottle. Shake the water bottles to mix the ingredients.

Place the funnel into the opening of your volcano so that the spout flows into the water bottle when you're ready to make your volcano erupt. Pour the pre-made lava into the funnel. Add three tbsp. of baking soda to start the eruption process.

About the Author

Taylor DiVico is a professional songwriter, content writer, fiction novelist and poet with more than 15 years of experience. DiVico holds a B.A. in philosophy from the University of Rhode Island and an M.S. from Syracuse University.