How to Build a Container Where Ice Will Not Melt for 4 Hours

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Ice can be essential to enjoying a hot summer day, long trip or outdoor party. If you have to keep your ice solid and don't have a cooler, you can make your own using a cardboard box using aluminum foil, an insulator like cloth and some glue.

1. Cover a Box in Aluminum Foil

Procure a cardboard or plastic box to hold your ice. The size of the box will depend on the amount of ice you need to transport. Cover all sides of the box, including the lid, with aluminum foil. Have the shiny side of the aluminum foil facing away from the box, as it will reflect more light than the dull side. Glue the foil in place. The reflective nature of the aluminum foil will prevent heat and light from penetrating the box, keeping the ice safe.

2. Line the Box with Foam or Fabric

Line the inside of the box with foam or thick fabric, such as nylon. The thick materials will insulate the box, preventing the coldness of the ice from seeping out. This will keep the inside of the box at the same temperature as the ice for a longer period of time.

3. Seal the Ice Box

Seal the box completely. Wrap more aluminum foil around the top and any seams of the box to prevent heat from entering. Do not open the box again unless you intend to extract the ice. This box will keep the ice safe for at least four hours, with limited melting.

Keep the container out of direct sunlight as much as possible to lessen the chances of melting. The more ice or other cold substances you put in the box, the longer the box will keep a low internal temperature.

References

About the Author

Samantha Volz has been involved in journalistic and informative writing for over eight years. She holds a bachelor's degree in English literature from Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, with a minor in European history. In college she was editor-in-chief of the student newspaper and completed a professional internship with the "Williamsport Sun-Gazette," serving as a full-time reporter. She resides in Horsham, Pennsylvania.

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