How to Calculate Real Volumes in Excel

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Excel 2013 makes several categories of math problems easier, among them calculating volumes in solid geometry. While keying numbers into a calculator can get you the right answer, Excel allows you to enter multiple dimensions for the solid you're working from, change them, and then see the differences in volume. Entering in the classical volume formulas is merely a matter of knowing how to enter them in an Excel-friendly format.

Volume of an Ellipsoid

    Enter the labels "Radius 1," "Radius 2" and "Radius 3" in cells A1, B1 and C1, respectively.

    Enter the following formula in cell D2:

    \=(4/3)_PI()_A2_B2_C2

    Enter the three different radii for the ellipsoid whose volume you want to enter in cells A2, B2 and C2. Entering the same number for all three values gives you the volume of a sphere.

Volume of a Rectangular Solid

    Enter the labels "Height," "Width" and "Length" in cells A4, B4 and C4, respectively.

    Enter the following formula in cell D5:

    \=A5_B5_C5

    Enter the three different side dimensions for the rectangular solid whose volume you're deriving in cells A5, B5 and C5. If you enter the same dimensions for all three values, you're calculating the volume of a cube.

Volume of a Cylindrical Solid

    Enter the labels "Radius" and "Height" in cells A7 and B7, respectively.

    Enter the following formula in cell D8:

    \=PI()_A8^2_B8

    Enter the radius and height of the cylinder in cells A8 and B8.

Volume of a Cone

    Enter the labels "Radius" and "Height" in cells A10 and B10, respectively.

    Enter the following formula in cell D11:

    \=PI()_A11^2_B11*(1/3)

    Enter the radius and height of the cone in cells A11 and B11.

Volume of a Torus

    Enter the labels "Outer Radius" and "Inner Radius in cells A13 and B13, respectively.

    Enter the following formula in cell D14:

    \=(1/4)_PI()^2_A14+B14*(A14-B14)^2

    Enter the inner and outer radius of the torus in cells A14 and B14.

References

About the Author

Ken Burnside has been writing freelance since 1990, contributing to publications as diverse as "Pyramid" and "Training & Simulations Journal." A Microsoft MVP in Excel, he holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Alaska. He won the Origins Award for Attack Vector: Tactical, a board game about space combat.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision./Digital Vision/Getty Images

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