How to Determine How Much Your Finals Affect Your Grade

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Going into finals can be a stressful thing. However, you can perform calculations to determine how a final may affect your grade. This can be done using three scenarios: One, you get a zero on the final; two, you get a 100; and three is a guess as to what you think you will get. Doing this gives you a range of what your final grade may be.

    Calculate the total amount of points you have in the class before the final and the total number of possible points available. For example, assume you have a 90 out of a 100, a 40 out of 50 and a 65 out of 75 going into the finals. Total points is 90 plus 40 plus 65, which equals 195 points. Total available points is 225.

    Find out how many points you final is worth and make a conservative guess of your test grade. In the example, assume the test is worth 200 points and you think you will get 165 points.

    Add total available points to the points the final is worth. In the example, 225 plus 200 equals 425 points.

    Divide your total points by the points available after the final. In the example, 195 points divided by 425 points equals 45.8 percent final grade if you get a zero on your test.

    Add your guess at a grade to your total points. Then, divide the result by the points after the final. In the example, 165 points plus 195 points equals 360 points. Then, 360 points divided by 425 points equals 84.7 percent. This is your grade with your guess on your finals grade.

    Add a the total points the final is worth to your total points. Then, divide the result by the points after the final. In the example, 195 points plus 200 points equals 395 points. Then, 395 points divided by 425 points equals 92.9 percent. This is your grade if you get a perfect score on the final.

    Tips

    • The same calculations can be done based on weight. Just use the weight of the grade on your final as total points possible.

References

About the Author

Carter McBride started writing in 2007 with CMBA's IP section. He has written for Bureau of National Affairs, Inc and various websites. He received a CALI Award for The Actual Impact of MasterCard's Initial Public Offering in 2008. McBride is an attorney with a Juris Doctor from Case Western Reserve University and a Master of Science in accounting from the University of Connecticut.

Photo Credits

  • Ciaran Griffin/Lifesize/Getty Images

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