How to Make a Wind Break While Camping

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Experiencing the great outdoors is more enjoyable it you can stay out of the wind when you are camping. Once the wind gets up, the temperature drops, sometimes – particularly in the winter -- drastically. An outside temperature of 40, for example, falls to 28.4 if there is a 30-mph wind. Build the wind break before you need it so you don’t have to work in high winds or rain.

    Cut as many 6-foot lengths of trees as you need for the area. Sharpen the ends with an ax and then plant them in the ground. Secure the fence with saplings that run horizontally along your fence. Nail or tie them into place.

    Tie the ends of the tarp or boat cover to two sharpened poles and insert the poles into the ground. For reinforcement, add a couple of more poles in the middle and along the sides.

    Cut or break spruce boughs. Pile them up or sharpen the ends and plant them. Spruce boughs' fan-like shape helps block the wind.

    Move your tent into the bush where the wind can’t get at you. Tie a tarp across the opening in the direction from which the wind is blowing. Add spruce boughs on the side for additional protection.

    Build a snow fence for winter camping. Get light softwood pieces that are about 6 feet high. Connect the pieces with wire and then set it out to catch the snow as it blows. Snow provides good insulation against the wind and is an environmentally friendly wind break.

    Tips

    • If you can’t build a wind break, park your vehicle to block the wind. Position it so it serves as a breaker between you and the campfire. Getting out of the wind – with the additional heat from the fire – will keep you warm.

References

About the Author

Jody Hanson began writing professionally in 1992 to help finance her second around-the-world trip. In addition to her academic books, she has written for "International Living," the "Sydney Courier" and the "Australian Woman's Forum." Hanson holds a Ph.D. in adult education from Greenwich University.

Photo Credits

  • Polka Dot/Polka Dot/Getty Images

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