What Are the Three Principles of Gravity That Affect the Body?

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Gravity is the force that pulls your body toward the Earth. Three principles of gravity affect the body. Gravity is affected by your body's mass. For you to stand upright, you must properly align your bones and muscles to compensate for gravity. Understanding the principles of gravity can help you increase your balance.

Center of Gravity

The center of gravity occurs in the body at a point where weight is equally distributed on all sides. Center of gravity can also be referred to as center of mass. From this point, a body can pivot in any direction and remain balanced. When standing evenly over your center of gravity, you are in a state of equilibrium.

Line of Gravity

The line of gravity is an imaginary line that crosses through your center of gravity dividing the mass of the body into two equal halves. This line changes depending on the body's weight distribution. It is a vertical line running from the top of the head, usually around the ear, down to the ground. To keep your body in balance, your posture must correspond with your line of gravity.

Base of Support

How wide you spread your feet determines your base of support. The closer your center of gravity is to the ground, the more support you will have; the farther apart you place your feet, the steadier you will feel. A good base of support is needed if you are doing heavy lifting or moving heavy objects.

Gravity and the Body

Gravity affects many parts of your body as you age. It compresses the spine, contributes to poor blood circulation and can decrease your flexibility. The gravitational pull also affects your organs, causing them to shift downward, away from their proper position. Gravity is often blamed for the way excess weight accumulates around the midsection.

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About the Author

Kathleen Mulvaney has been a freelance writer since 2006, with experience in journalism, photography and film production. She is also pursuing a degree in audio engineering at New Jersey City University.

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