Why Are Trees Important to the Ecosystem?

••• Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

Trees are important to the ecosystem for several reasons. Without trees, human life could not exist on Earth.

Human Health

According to the Community Forest Guidebook, 100 trees remove about five tons of CO2, and 1000 pounds of other pollutants within their lifetime. CO2 is toxic to the human body so it is important for trees to remove it.

Pollutants

The pollutants that 100 trees remove in their lifetime also include 400 pounds of ozone and 300 pounds of particulates. This is crucial for those people who suffer from respiratory disease.

Reduce Heat

Especially in urban areas, trees are able to reduce ambient temperatures. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen and other pollutants can cause a “heat-island effect.” However, trees are able to reduce the heat by 5 to 8 degrees.

Water and Soil

After storms, trees are able to trap large amounts of water in their leaves, trunks and branches. The Community Forest Guidebook says that for every 1,000 trees, storm water run-off is reduced by one million gallons.

Shelter

Trees provide shade that is necessary for keeping animals from the heat outdoors. Trees also provide a home for many types of animals.

Related Articles

Environmental Problems Caused by Deforestation of Tropical...
How Does Deforestation Affect the Air?
Why Is Deforestation a Serious Global Environmental...
Alaskan Tundra Facts
The Effects of Cutting Down Trees on the Ecosystem
Negative Effects of Clear-Cutting
What Are the Causes of the Destruction of Ecosystem?
How Do Trees Turn Carbon Dioxide into Oxygen?
Examples of Secondary Pollutants
How Do Trees Move?
Gases That Cause Air Pollution
Types of Forest Ecosystems
How can we prevent land pollution?
Disadvantages of Cutting Down the Rain Forest
How Is Carbon Dioxide Absorbed During Photosynthesis?
The Disadvantages of Deforestation
Hurricane Maria's Aftermath: Ecological Disaster Continues
The Importance of the Forest Ecosystem
The Greenhouse Effect & Photosynthesis
Environmental Problems in Temperate Deciduous Forests