What Are Some Common Household Acids & Bases?

By Chris Deziel; Updated April 24, 2017
The alkalinity of soap helps make it slippery.

The concentration of free hydrogen atoms is what determines a solution's acidity or alkalinity. This concentration is measured by pH, a term that originally referred to the "power of hydrogen." Household chemicals that are acidic generally have a sour taste -- although tasting is not recommended -- and those that are alkaline taste bitter.

Acids

Two of the most sour items in any kitchen are lemon juice, which contains citric acid, and vinegar, which contains acetic acid. Both have pH values around 2.5, which means that they are strongly acidic; any solutions with a pH below 7 are acidic, and any with a pH above 7 are alkaline. In fact, any sour juice is acidic, as are tangy carbonated beverages that contain phosphoric acid.

Bases

One of the most common bases in any home is baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, although with a pH of 8.2, it is only slightly alkaline. The chemicals you use to clean your drain are far more alkaline; sodium hydroxide, also known as caustic soda, has a pH of 12.0. Ammonia and laundry detergent, with pH values of 8.3 and 9.4, respectively, are also bases.

About the Author

A love of fundamental mysteries led Chris Deziel to obtain a bachelor's degree in physics and a master's degree in humanities. A prolific carpenter, home renovator and furniture restorer, Deziel has been active in the building and home design trades since 1975. As a landscape builder, he helped establish two gardening companies.