Water pH & Pollution

By Milton Kazmeyer
Pollution can drastically alter bodies of water.

One of the most devastating side effects of pollution is increased acidity in rain and groundwater. This affects animals and plants, and has long-term implications for our environment.

The pH Scale

The pH scale measures the acidity or alkalinity of a liquid, from 0 to 14—7 is neutral, anything below 7 is acidic and anything higher is alkaline.

Natural Water

Rain and groundwater tend to be naturally slightly acidic, usually no lower than 6 on the pH scale. Most plants and animals tolerate this level of acidity without any problems.

Pollution

Byproducts of air and water pollution are acidic. While natural alkaline substances in the soil can reduce their impact, the result of such pollution is often a much more acidic environment than normal.

Acid Rain

When low-pH water spreads via precipitation, it is called acid rain. As it soaks into the ground and collects in streams, it can drastically change the ecosystem.

Consequences

As pH drops, more fragile plants and animals may become sick and die. In addition, a pH change in a body of water can affect the microorganisms living within, with domino effects that can destroy the entire aquatic food chain.

About the Author

Milton Kazmeyer has worked in the insurance, financial and manufacturing fields and also served as a federal contractor. He began his writing career in 2007 and now works full-time as a writer and transcriptionist. His primary fields of expertise include computers, astronomy, alternative energy sources and the environment.