Speed Skating in Winter Olympics

Pioneered by the Dutch in the 13th century, skating began as a method of transportation when natives used homemade skates to traverse across frozen rivers and canals. The first official speed skating events were held in 1863 in Oslo, Norway, and the sport made its Olympic debut in 1924.

Pioneered by the Dutch in the 13th century, skating began as a method of transportation when natives used homemade skates to traverse across frozen rivers and canals. The first official speed skating events were held in 1863 in Oslo, Norway, and the sport made its Olympic debut in 1924.

Pioneered by the Dutch in the 13th century, skating began as a method of transportation when natives used homemade skates to traverse across frozen rivers and canals. The first official speed skating events were held in 1863 in Oslo, Norway, and the sport made its Olympic debut in 1924.

Individual

Individual speed skating races feature athletes skating a variety of distances and competing for the fastest time. Mens races feature events at 500, 1000, 1500, 5,000 and 10,000 meters. In women’s races, the two longest events are 3,000 and 5,000 meters.

Pioneered by the Dutch in the 13th century, skating began as a method of transportation when natives used homemade skates to traverse across frozen rivers and canals. The first official speed skating events were held in 1863 in Oslo, Norway, and the sport made its Olympic debut in 1924.

Mass Start

In this 16-lap competition, the entire field of skaters (maximum of 24) begin the race simultaneously. Results are determined by “sprint points,” which are awarded during three intermediate sprints after lap 4, 8 and 12, in addition to the final sprint. The point system guarantees that the skaters to cross the finish line first, second and third will receive the gold, silver and bronze medals, respectively.

Pioneered by the Dutch in the 13th century, skating began as a method of transportation when natives used homemade skates to traverse across frozen rivers and canals. The first official speed skating events were held in 1863 in Oslo, Norway, and the sport made its Olympic debut in 1924.

Team Pursuit

Pitting two teams of three skaters against each other, a team pursuit race takes place in three phases: quarterfinals, semifinals and finals. Each round is single-elimination, meaning a team must win each round, including the finals, to secure a gold medal. Skaters begin on opposite sides of the oval track, with women racing six laps and men eight.

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