Bobsled in Winter Olympics

Invented by the Swiss in the late 1860s, bobsleigh features athletes completing timed runs down twisting ice tracks in a gravity-powered sled. Naturally, Switzerland leads the historic medal table with 31 total.

Invented by the Swiss in the late 1860s, bobsleigh features athletes completing timed runs down twisting ice tracks in a gravity-powered sled. Naturally, Switzerland leads the historic medal table with 31 total.

Invented by the Swiss in the late 1860s, bobsleigh features athletes completing timed runs down twisting ice tracks in a gravity-powered sled. Naturally, Switzerland leads the historic medal table with 31 total.

Four Man

The driver and brakman are joined by two push athletes, as teams race four times in two days, with the fastest combined time determining the gold medalists.

Invented by the Swiss in the late 1860s, bobsleigh features athletes completing timed runs down twisting ice tracks in a gravity-powered sled. Naturally, Switzerland leads the historic medal table with 31 total.

Two Man

A driver and brakeman compose a two-person squad, which completes four runs over two days. The final rankings are determined by the fastest total time.

Invented by the Swiss in the late 1860s, bobsleigh features athletes completing timed runs down twisting ice tracks in a gravity-powered sled. Naturally, Switzerland leads the historic medal table with 31 total.

Two Woman

Added to the Olympics in 2002, the two-woman event mirrors just like the men’s — four runs in two days. The fastest aggregate time wins gold.

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