Luge in Winter Olympics

Athletes bolt down an ice track on a small sled, feet-first, reaching speeds up to 90 mph. Competing against a timer, athletes are timed down to a thousandth of a second, making luge one of the most meticulously timed sports. The sport features both singles and doubles contest, the latter featuring one riding lying on top of the other.

Athletes bolt down an ice track on a small sled, feet-first, reaching speeds up to 90 mph. Competing against a timer, athletes are timed down to a thousandth of a second, making luge one of the most meticulously timed sports. The sport features both singles and doubles contest, the latter featuring one riding lying on top of the other.

Athletes bolt down an ice track on a small sled, feet-first, reaching speeds up to 90 mph. Competing against a timer, athletes are timed down to a thousandth of a second, making luge one of the most meticulously timed sports. The sport features both singles and doubles contest, the latter featuring one riding lying on top of the other.

Singles/Doubles

The singles competition takes place over two days, with two runs on each day. An athlete’s four times are added together, with the fastest total time determining who wins gold. Doubles competition takes place on one day, with two runs to determine the winning total time.

Athletes bolt down an ice track on a small sled, feet-first, reaching speeds up to 90 mph. Competing against a timer, athletes are timed down to a thousandth of a second, making luge one of the most meticulously timed sports. The sport features both singles and doubles contest, the latter featuring one riding lying on top of the other.

Mixed Event

The team relay event grants teams three sleeds: women’s singles, men’s singles and doubles. The next sled begins after the previous sled presses an overhead touchpad at the bottom of the track. Timing is continuous, so the nation with the lowest time after all three sleds is awarded gold.

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